What are your candidates really thinking?

Employee Interview | HR Consultant | The People & Culture Office

About one in four job hunters in Australia go into an interview with the mindset of interviewing the employer, according to new research by Indeed. Furthermore, the study found that 70% of job hunters consider the interview as an opportunity for them to get to know the company.

Businesses and hiring managers often forget the recruitment process is a two way process, yes you are assessing the candidate but remember they are judging you too. From your advertisement to the questions asked at interview you are building a brand for your business, remember, the candidate has a choice too and as the skills shortage begins to make a significant impact on business operations the ability for business to showcase why working for you will be a great career move will be pivotal.

82% of employers think that a bad candidate experience has little or no effect on the company, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey. Subsequently, a majority of employers respond to less than half of the candidates who apply. On the other side of the coin, 84% of candidates expect a personal email response, and more than half anticipate a phone call. Thanking a potential employee for taking the time to apply for job at your company is a small courtesy. But what many get is a brush-off akin to last night’s date sitting by the phone, waiting for the call that never comes. You can read more about the importance of communicating with your candidates here.

The interview process is as much of a process for the candidate to assess you as much as you are assessing them. If you are running late, are unorganised, come across as rude or abrupt, ask unlawful questions, don’t ask relevant questions, or don’t communicate with your candidates, then chances are your candidate will walk away thinking you are a cowboy operation they want no part of – no matter how much you are paying.

In a world where disappointed candidates can send their plight viral with a few keystrokes and the click of a button, it’s time for employers to stop treating candidates like the proverbial pain in the butt and start treating them like a customer in their business. At a time when industry leaders and managers clamor for more qualified skilled workers, it doesn’t pay for companies to be lazy and incompetent when it comes to recruitment. Candidates expect more. And they deserve better.

The People & Culture Office can develop a bespoke package of recruitment solutions, including detailed job and person specifications and advertising options.  We can ensure that you are selling the position, your brand, and, culture to ensure your newest recruits not only have the necessary skills and experience, but also the right values and attitudes.

Based in Kalgoorlie, The People & Culture Office is an independent HR Consultant who can partner with you to offer a one stop HR solution, we only charge you for the work we perform; no contracts, no annual or monthly fees, just quality service. Click here to learn more

Managing employee complaints; don’t be “that” employer

Employee Complaint | HR Consultant | The People & Culture Office

As someone who has worked as a HR professional for some years, I can say that it’s not unusual for an employee to approach me wanting to talk about being bullied, harassed or discriminated against in some way. It takes a lot of guts for an employee to speak to management or HR about their concerns; depending on the situation and the persons involved they may subject themselves to more inappropriate behaviour; ostracise themselves from the team, or, open the floodgates to the commencement of what sometimes is a long and emotionally taxing process.

There are often occasions in which the person just wants to let someone know or have an opportunity to vent, but doesn’t want to go as far as lodging a formal complaint. Those occasions place management or HR in a difficult position.  From the individual’s perspective, the opportunity to unburden may be a great relief but from where the manager or HR sits, the information that has been communicated is in a zone that’s akin to a no-man’s land. A complaint has been received but the complainant does not want to call it a complaint.

We are now in an era where human behaviour and the law are combining to produce circumstances that result in management or HR being exposed to legal action being taken against them as individuals in the performance of their duties. There tends to be a belief from managers that they must wait until a formal complaint is made before they can take any action. This belief, which is false, sometimes reinforces a business’ reluctance to investigate and can be used by a manager to stick their head in the sand about what is going on in the workplace.

Under work health and safety legislation, contract and tort, an employer must take all reasonable steps to protect the health and safety of employees. This includes taking action as soon as becoming aware of serious workplace concerns, regardless of the way these may be communicated to the business.

In a recent case a female employee was placed into a role as a team leader in traffic control at a railway level crossing site by Marriott Support Services. During one of her projects, the female employee worked alongside a male worker from another organisation, Rail Safe Working Solutions. Marriott and Rail Safe were engaged by contractor Lendlease to provide traffic and pedestrian management services during the project.

According to the female employee, the male Rail Safe worker repeatedly acted inappropriately. He stood too close to her and other workers, criticised the Marriott disability program she was part of – stating she was “not employed on [her] merit”– and made sexually aggressive and violent comments in her presence.

Both the immediate manager and the divisional manager believed the majority of the claims made by the female employee. But, according to the tribunal’s report, the divisional manager said she looked tired, and suggested that she was “being oversensitive” and may have misinterpreted the comments. The report says the divisional manager reminded the female employee that she didn’t have to make a formal statement, that she could refuse to get involved in “site politics” and it was “predominantly a working man environment in construction and that there was always going to be unwanted attention to women”.

This caused the female employee to believe her complaint wasn’t being taken seriously because she was female. She believes she wasn’t offered enough support, that the complaint wasn’t effectively documented and that she was “actively discouraged” from making the formal complaint. It seems the tribunal agreed, ordering Marriott to pay her $10,000 in damages.

The matter of Watts v Ramsay Health Care serves as a timely reminder of the importance of ensuring that as managers and HR professionals, you understand the requirements and purpose of your Bullying and Harassment policies. Specifically, it highlights that poor management decisions, in this case, the decision not to investigate an employee’s complaint, can form part of a bullying claim.

Ms Watt, a catering assistant at Glengarry Private hospital, had (on at least two occasions during 2017) bought to the attention of her direct manager and Ramsay’s HR manager, allegations of bullying and harassment against several of her fellow workers. She alleged that she was being bullied by co-workers on her morning shift in that they had accused her of smoking beyond her allocated break, not doing her job properly, smelling of alcohol and that she had been subjected to other defamatory remarks.

Noting that Ms Watts had raised these concerns with her managers, including in the context of investigation of her own performance or behaviour, Ramsay determined not to commence any kind of enquiry or investigation into Ms Watt’s allegations, citing a lack of specific information and/or evidence about the allegations for their decision.

In granting Ms Watt’s application, the Fair Work Commission accepted that the managers had behaved “unreasonably” towards Ms Watt and that their decision not to investigate Ms Watt’s bullying allegations was not ‘reasonable management action’. The FWC determined that Ms Watt had been understandably reticent to name the offenders, but had nonetheless provided her managers with sufficient information and that those managers had “imposed their own requirements’ on how Ms Watts must complain to them about alleged bullying before they would commence an investigation”

The FWC also concluded that the managers failure to investigate Ms Watt’s complaints was a breach of Ramsay’s own Discrimination, Bullying and Harassment Policy which did not require the level of detail her managers required her to provide in relation to the bullying she alleged. Ms Watt was granted a Stop Bullying Order under s789FD of the Fair Work Act.

In another case the Supreme Court of Victoria has sent a solemn message to employers to sit up and listen to employees who make complaints of bullying and harassment in the workplace, by awarding damages in excess of $1.3 million to a plaintiff suffering psychiatric and physical injuries because her employer failed to provide a safe working environment. The alleged conduct was repeated and severe, including not only being referred to as a “spastic” and a “bimbo”, but also sexual harassment (both verbal and physical) and threats of sexual assault.

The complainant gave evidence that she was reluctant to complain to her immediate superior, because he too was responsible for some of the offensive conduct. On occasions when she did raise concerns, she was met with laughter. When she raised her complaint with her Area Site Manager, he said words to the effect of “leave it with me”, but to her reckoning nothing was done save for the fact that she was moved to another work site for a 10 month period, before being moved back to the original site (upon which the problems recommenced). The complainant eventually resigned after developing high levels of anxiety, stress and depression.

While the circumstances in this case may seem extreme, it is a reminder to employers of the significant costs that can result if employee complaints of bullying and harassment in the workplace are not received, considered and actioned in an appropriate and timely manner. Under federal anti-discrimination laws, if an employer wants to argue that the organisation should not be held liable for any discrimination or harassment by one of its employees, the employer will need to demonstrate that the organisation took ‘reasonable precautions and exercised due diligence’ or took ‘all reasonable steps’ to prevent the discrimination or harassment. While the size of the employer is relevant to these considerations, an important factor that is likely to be considered is whether the organisation has an effective complaint handling procedure and if employees have been sufficiently trained in the execution of the policy.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

 

 

 

 

Innovation in HR + strategy = business success

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A different kind of HR Consultant is my tag line, but what does it mean? When I launched, my concept and business model was to be recognised as an innovative, efficient & impactful HR partner, creating improved business performance through best practice.

Business will invest thousands in machinery and software with the aim to innovate; provide a better service to industry and as a cost saving measure. They outsource or recruit in house finance specialists to conduct in-depth analytics to identify areas for increasing operating profit; where to tighten the reigns and tax efficiency measures. So when it comes to your employees, your greatest asset, how much emphasis do you place on the HR function to embed innovative human resource solutions in your organisation that will align with your strategy to achieve business success?

Several years ago I was engaged as the HR Manager for a local organisation in a niche industry. Prior to my commencement the HR function, like many businesses, was seen as an administrative task. It was recruitment, payroll & terminations. The policies that they had purchased at great expense from an external provider were basic & did not reflect contemporary best practice. The approach to recruitment was what is referred to as “bums on seats”, meaning if you applied and you weren’t a serial killer you were employed.

First order of business was to implement a structured compensation strategy consisting of structured remuneration and policy to guide the organisation on mapping pay levels and annual increases,  I introduced a very cost effective employee reward system, rewrote every HR policy to align the policies with the Strategic Plan, and, to reflect contemporary HR practice and introduced a Performance Management System that focussed on aligning employee behaviour to the values of the organisation.

After a very busy 6 months I conducted an Employee Feedback survey to tap into the pulse of the organisation, in order to understand if we were heading down the right track we had to show transparency as an Executive and seek feedback from employees and feed those results back to them. The results weren’t great, the bulk of the 120 strong work force didn’t know or understand how their role fit into the wider organisational goals, they weren’t engaged, they told us communication was lacking and they didn’t feel inspired by their leaders.

Phase 2 involved the introduction of a behavioural & values  based recruitment strategy. This means the core focus was on applicants that yes, possessed the skills to undertake the work, but more importantly, they were able to demonstrate throughout the interview process that they shared the same values as the organisation. The recruitment focus changed focus from “I need someone and I need them now” to “ Right person, for the right job at the right time”. Leadership training was implemented to build capacity across the organisation and we continued to show our appreciation for employees by sharing communications of company initiatives, taking the time to be more personal in our interactions and the introduction of Christmas gifts (again very cost effective but very appreciated).

At the end of the first full financial year of these initiatives in place employee turnover reduced from 35% to 26%, our second Employee Satisfaction survey told us employees were a lot more optimistic overall and of course the flow on effect from this was our clients reported greater satisfaction in the services received.

They key to seeing these results was leaving behind that notation that HR is either not need or purely an admin function. When engaged properly HR is a true strategic partner, we can work with you to embed & strengthen organisational capability to give you that competitive edge over the competition. In short, this means developing a particular mix of resources, processes and values that makes it hard for rivals to match what your organisation does.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

 

 

Hair & Beauty Salon employee guide – available now!

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Hair & Beauty Salon owners, we now have an employee guide tailored specifically to salon employees available for purchase. But why do I need one I hear you ask, well hear me out because an employee handbook can be the key to managing your team & culture.

As a salon owner, it can be extremely challenging juggling the demands of running a hair and beauty salon, this is especially the case if you are running a smaller business with fewer employees to delegate other responsibilities to.

From a customers perspective I want to frequent a salon for a particular experience, I’m about to drop some serious coin, I want to do it in a place that fit’s with my identity, my perception of a great experience and I want to find an affinity with my stylist. Client affinity is defined as having an inherent similarity, a liking for or an attraction to something, a quality that makes people or things suited to each other. In contemporary business, client affinity equals loyalty. The most efficient way to build affinity with clients is to develop a strong ethos (a set of salon values, goals, culture, and mission) which your target audience is likely to share.

Think of your employee guide as an internal marketing tool to help you communicate clearly, manage your team’s expectations and shape your salon culture. It’s a clear way of setting out expected behaviour, attitudes and standards. The ultimate guide on “How we do things here” and the perfect place to cover potentially tricky topics such as:

  • Mobile phone and social media use
  • Dress code
  • Acceptable behaviour standards in salon
  • Bullying
  • Attendance
  • Parental leave
  • Your salon disciplinary process
  • Ending employment

An employee guide lets you spell out both your salon procedures and Employment Law, reducing the room for any misunderstanding (deliberate or otherwise). Not only are written guidelines invaluable when you’re faced with argumentative employees, they can also help to keep you away from legal disputes.

The guide will be individually tailored towards your salon, all policies reflect contemporary human resource practice, offer step by step procedures and are fully compliant to Australian workplace law and legislation.

Your guide will contain the following;

  • Leave Policy & Leave Application Form
  • EEO, Anti-discrimination, Bullying & Harassment Policy
  • Medication, Drugs and Alcohol Policy
  • Social Media Policy
  • Occupational Health & Safety Policy
  • Employee Grievance Policy
  • Discipline & Termination Policy
  • Letter of Offer, including clauses to restrict poaching of salon clients & data
  • Personal Details Form
  • Payroll Details Form
  • Achievement & Career Development Check-in

Please visit our Shop for pricing.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

Why employee motivation is the key to business success

Employee Annual Leave | HR Consultant | The People & Culture Office Kalgoorlie

It’s Friday, it’s a long weekend, school holidays start next week, the weather outside is glorious and I can hear the sound of a thousand West Aussies heading to Bali. It seems like a good time to discuss motivation 😂 because it’s not like we are all hanging out for knock off.

23% of the Australian workforce are said to be engaged, meaning Australia has one of the highest engagement rates in the world. A workforce is said to be made up of three types of employees, those that are engaged, not engaged and actively disengaged.

– Engaged Employees
Those employees within an organisation who are committed to the organisation and driven to moving the organisation forward.

– Not Engaged / Disengaged Employees
Those employees, who are present at work and put in the hours, however are not passionate about their job and aren’t utilising their full potential.

– Actively disengaged Employees
Those employees that don’t have an emotional commitment to work and often distract co-workers while they try and complete tasks. This can be due to their job not being suitable or not aligning with their skill set. They are often looking for employment elsewhere.

Employee happiness or satisfaction in the workplace does not necessarily equate to employee engagement. Employees can be happy and satisfied in their role, but not productive. For example: an employee may be happy and satisfied in their role because they spend much of the day chatting & socialising with colleagues, but aren’t necessarily performing their role adequately.

Instead, an engaged employee is one who aligns their behaviours and actions in the workplace, to meet their role requirements, as well as wider team and business goals and strategy. An engaged employee wants the organisation, your organisation, to succeed.

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So what are some clear signs your workforce isn’t engaged & motivated? Organisations can utilise workforce analytics to establish positive or negative engagement by looking at areas such as;

  • employee absenteeism (e.g. low unscheduled or personal leave)
  • retention (e.g. low turnover rates, positive exit interview comments)
  • punctuality (e.g. employees arrive on time, working designated hours)
  • productivity (e.g. quality and quantity of output, staff meeting Key Performance Indicators)
  • safety (e.g. low accident/incident rates)

The difficulty with knowing how to engage and motivate employees is that often the strategies that will work for each employee, are as individual and unique as they are.

When organisations design and implement HR initiatives that acknowledge employee engagement and motivational factors, they are building the base for developing and supporting effective employees and teams. Consistent, clear and well-communicated HR practices can lead to employees trusting management and one-another, better communication, sharing of knowledge and ultimately achieving strategic business objectives.

Employees will be more committed and willing to work to their full potential…and less likely to leave.

HR FUNCTION RELATION TO EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT AND MOTIVATION
Compensation and benefits Although not a sole factor, an employee who feels adequately compensated is less likely to leave an organisation.
HR Policy Provides a consistent process to follow – inaccessible or policies that confuse can lead to disengagement and demotivation amongst employees.
Industrial Relations Local/State/Federal legislation outline minimum requires organisations must meet in regards to employment agreements/contracts, health and safety etc.
Job descriptions Provides a clear document that details responsibilities and parameters that both employees and managers can referred to and adjust as required.

Job descriptions which are linked to wider team and organisational goals also show employees how their role contributes to wider strategic business objectives.

Performance Management Offers an ongoing opportunity for employees and managers to plan, monitor and review employee’s work objectives and overall alignment and contribution to wider strategic business goals. Provides for open communication platform between employees and managers about what employee is expected to accomplish, while also enabling conversations around employee learning and development, and career progression.
Learning and Development Offers an opportunity for individual’s personal and professional developmental needs and wants to be met.
Diversity Provides for an environment where individual needs are acknowledged, and employees feel safe and free from harassment.
Work Health and Safety Employees who feel safe in their working environment are more likely to be motivated and engaged – a fear for personal safety will likely breed frustration and resentment, or a lack of caring which will likely lead to further health and safety issues.Organisations which takes a more holistic approach to health and safety (e.g. psychological wellness) will likely benefit – demonstrates an extra level of caring for employees.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

 

HR myths about SME’s busted

HR Consultant | The People & Culture Office

For those of us that live and breathe HR, it can be frustrating to constantly defend the importance of what we do. I frequently hear “Oh, we don’t need HR, our Office Manager handles that.”

Then there are those that think HR is nothing more than maintaining files and making sure payroll gets submitted. The truth is HR is much more than paper pushing and file maintenance. It takes great dedication, commitment and knowledge to be a true HR professional. There are a lot of areas where SMEs get into trouble with their HR, such as:

  • Managing grievances e.g. bullying, sexual harassment
  • Unfair dismissals
  • Managing underperformance of employees
  • Parental leave and the requirements for the employee and the employer
  • Managing absenteeism
  • Keeping up to date with HR legislation and implementing HR frameworks
  • …and the list goes on.

So on that note I’d like to bust some common myths that SME business owners hold about hiring external human resource consultants.

Myth: “I’m not sure they’d have a place in my business.” Reality: Every business that hires and deals with employees most likely needs an HR consultant at some point. You may need your HR framework drawn up and implemented from scratch, a strategy for recruitment, help managing an employee’s performance, or a business restructure to best facilitate growth and change.

Myth: “Hiring an HR person would probably cost me an arm and a leg.” Reality: Not hiring an HR consultant might end up costing you much, much more. Let’s look at unfair dismissal. In recent times, unfair dismissal payouts cost businesses sums of five figures or more. In the financial year 2016/17 Fair Work awarded 7,194 monetary claims for unfair dismissal at a median rate of equivalent to 8 weeks pay, of these, 810 were for amounts of $10,000 up to the maximum amount payable (26 weeks of the employees earnings), these figures do not include fines imposed on businesses where applications were heard before a full hearing of the Commission,  a recent sexual harassment pay out was  $130,000. Evidence suggests that these high costs are usually incurred due to a lack of compliant HR policies, procedures or poor documentation. Hiring a HR consultant means you’ll be fully compliant in all these key areas.

Myth: “They’ll just give me cookie-cutter advice that won’t apply to my business.” Reality:  The People & Culture Office will come into your business tailoring a solution to your exact needs. For example, you may be managing the performance of your operations manager. How can you manage the risk? We provide commercially viable and relevant advice helping you deal with any and all HR issues.

Myth: “These HR types will try and lock me into some kind of pricy ongoing agreement.” Reality: The People & Culture Offices’ business model works on a once-off or project basis. Depending on your business needs I don’t need to stick around for months or years on end. The People & Culture Office can provide a framework for your HR needs with ongoing HR support as and when required. It’s your business, you control the level of involvement, not me.

Myth: “HR is just about recruitment.” Reality: Recruitment is just one of the activities an HR professional does. Human Resource function is as vast as any other technical function can be and is segregated into multiple areas. While HR is the first and last point of contact for any employee in the hiring and exit process, it surely isn’t the only thing HR professionals are there for. There are several other areas any successful HR department caters to like employee engagement, training and development, performance management, resource management and many more.

Myth: “Anyone can do HR.” Reality: HR activities are based on theory, research and most importantly, practical experience to understand how to apply HR principals into the workplace. I decided to launch my own consultancy service after hearing many stories from Goldfields business that employees were being directed by the “HR Person” to take annual leave on a gazetted public holidays, to book annual leave just to get day’s off from continual rostered shifts, leaving them with no leave to actually take a holiday, telling employees on parental leave their job has been given to someone else and employees being given written warnings for time off sick when a Doctors Certificate is present. There is a shortage of skilled HR people in the region which unfortunately has seen the rise of admin personnel being promoted into positions that require a great deal of technical skill & knowledge, this practice isn’t good for business and exposes the organisation to a great deal of risk.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

 

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Are you getting employee discipline & termination right?

Employee Working | HR Consultant | The People & Culture Office

The discipline or termination of an employee is never easy. It’s important that your termination procedure is compliant with Australia’s unfair dismissal laws and is based on an understanding of your employee’s rights. If you have employees you should have comprehensive policies and procedures in place to educate employees on the expected standards of behaviour and how you will approach any disciplinary actions relating to a breach of those standards. I’ve written about the importance of workplace HR Policies here and here.

Under Australia’s workplace laws there are some keys steps that must be followed for a termination to be lawful, the big one is whether the action taken meets the principles of “procedural fairness” or “natural justice”. This means the employee has been made aware of the allegations concerning their conduct and are given the right to defend the allegations put to them, this implies an opportunity that might result in the employer deciding not to terminate the employment if the defence is of substance. An employer may simply go through the motions of giving the employee an opportunity to deal with allegations concerning conduct when, in substance, a firm decision to terminate had already been made which would be adhered to irrespective of anything the employee might say in his or her defence. An example of this is walking into a disciplinary meeting with a pre-written letter of termination or warning in your notebook ready to pass across the table to the employee once you have put the allegations to them.

More and more with unfair dismissal cases Fair Work is looking at the process the employer followed as opposed to the conduct of the employee, it pays to have good policies & procedures in place and more importantly, to follow them. Particularly with breaches of policy such as WHS and Medication, Drugs & Alcohol the Commission is going to want to see evidence that the employee;

  • knew what was required of them
  • knew a breach of the safety requirement / policy could result in dismissal
  • An adequate investigation took place
  • was given a fair opportunity to respond to the allegation
  • failed to give an adequate response to the allegation

In regards to breaches of Medication, Drugs & Alcohol policies employers must verify a breach has occurred, this requires the sample to be sent for GCMS testing to confirm the presence of illicit substances in excess of the Australian Standards, a positive at the cup is not a verified positive result.

Best Practice

  • Failure to warn employees that their conduct may lead to their dismissal is usually considered a major employer omission by the Commission. This means there should be a ‘paper trail’ which documents the relevant incidents leading up to a dismissal.
  • Proper documentation is essential. It is advisable to have the employee sign the notes of any discussions relating to performance, although the employee is not legally obliged to do so. The employee should be given the opportunity to have a support person present, chosen by the employee.
  • The employee must be informed about all problems, be given an opportunity to respond, and allowed a reasonable period of time to remedy them.
  • In regards to written warnings the employee should be told this is the first warning in a process which may end in termination.
  • Under unfair dismissal laws, there is no statutory period of time in which a warning (verbal or written) remains valid.
  • The period a warning remains enforceable will depend on a number of factors, including the seriousness of the problem and the nature of the offence.
  • Between three and eight months is usually appropriate, but will obviously vary depending on the circumstances, such as how often the criteria for satisfactory performance can be applied to an employee.
  • A ‘shelf life’ of a year or longer for a written warning would be considered extreme in most cases before a tribunal.

BASED IN KALGOORLIE, THE PEOPLE & CULTURE OFFICE IS AN INDEPENDENT HR CONSULTANT WHO CAN PARTNER WITH YOU TO OFFER A ONE STOP HR SOLUTION, WE ONLY CHARGE YOU FOR THE WORK WE PERFORM; NO CONTRACTS, NO ANNUAL OR MONTHLY FEES, JUST QUALITY SERVICE. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

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